Mother’s Day in the Czech Republic

The Czech Republic celebrated its first Mother’s Day in 1926. Alice Masarykova, daughter of the President of Czechoslovakia, was instrumental in establishing this holiday. However, the communist later inaugurated Woman’s Day on March 8, which is still celebrated by many in Central and Eastern Europe. Woman’s Day is controversial owing to its politicized and propagandized […]

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Carl Trueman on the Reformation, Part 6

[ Carl Trueman on the Reformation, Part 5 ] In lecture 6, Dr. Trueman discusses the Leipzig Debate, which he views as a watershed moment in Luther’s life. Luther arrives in Leipzig surrounded by armed students. Before the debate, he preaches from Matthew 16 on the keys of the Kingdom, raising the ire of John Eck, who […]

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Dressing for a Wedding

Following the battle of White Mountain, Ferdinand II published an amnesty to all the Bohemian soldiers who would surrender their arms. The appearance of an amiable spirit towards the conquered continued for three months, catching many off guard who thought their only hope was to flee to another country. Then, in February of 1621, the […]

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Twenty-Seven Crosses in Old Town Square, Part 2

The battle began with the Catholic forces testing the Protestant flank. In the process, the Bohemian flank began to retreat. Although they did attempt to rally later in the battle, they were no match for Ferdinand’s troops. When all was said and done, the Protestants lost 4,000 men; Ferdinand only lost 700. Following the devastating […]

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Twenty-Seven Crosses in Old Town Square, Part 1

In the fifteenth century, Bohemia, the westernmost lands of the present day Czech Republic, experienced a spiritual reformation, blessed by leaders such as John Hus. Hus’s teachings continued to spread following his martyrdom, which troubled the Roman Catholic church greatly. By the early seventeenth century, the teachings of Calvin and Luther had spread throughout Europe. […]

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