Light Painting

There’s an interesting technique in night photography called light painting. You secure your camera on a tripod, set the aperture at about f11, and then set the speed for 10-20 seconds. Since vehicles are always on the move, city streets provide the perfect venue. Movement is the key to light painting. Whatever moves disappears from […]

Read More

Lend Me Your Ear

In the dark tragedy Othello, an ensign named Iago—one of Shakespeare’s worst villains— hatches a plot against his commander Othello, who Iago believes has overlooked his skill and promoted a man less worthy. Sadly, Othello listens to Iago’s innuendos and deceptions regarding his (Othello’s) new young wife, Desdemona, allowing them to play on his mind […]

Read More

For Better or for Worse

“Moderation is a fatal thing. Nothing succeeds like excess,” said Oscar Wilde prophetically of 21st century Western youth. Well, he didn’t exactly say this regarding youth in the West, but his words remain true just the same. We live in a time when our heroes are created by media recognition, their outstanding characteristics being such […]

Read More

House of Mourning

My grandparents walked to church on Sunday morning while listening to beckoning church bells, but they never entered the doors before first having strolled past the saints whose rest is won. The cemetery provided a silent pre-sermon for the faithful—and more importantly the not so faithful—that “a generation goes, and a generation comes” and each […]

Read More

Caterpillar in a Ring of Fire

Not too long ago we were introduced to a spiritual exercise called “The Tongue Assignment.” In a nutshell, you take one week and refrain from all of the following: complaining, criticizing, blame shifting, boasting, deceiving, gossiping, and defending yourself. It just so happened that we were packing for a trip, so we decided to start […]

Read More

Parenting vs. Guerrilla Warfare

Last Saturday I walked over to our local soccer field to meet up with my family. It was team picture day so various groups lined the fence in their bright-colored uniforms, looking like little escapees from a box of Crayola crayons. My eyes and ears drifted to one small boy who was refusing to cooperate, […]

Read More

From Earth to Heaven

Little children love their nighttime routines as long as they can extend them past the designated hour of bedtime. I usually tried my parents’ patience by whining and moaning—aided and abetted by my brother’s teasing— but all I got for the fuss was a quick ticket to bed. That really wasn’t such a bad thing, […]

Read More

The Boneyard

Last spring we packed our things and headed for Charleston. The historic district is one of our favorite places to hang out, although I’m not sure hanging out would describe our activities there. Normally, I spend days wandering around with my camera equipment, shooting black ironwork, cobblestone road patterns, and a hundred other fascinating details […]

Read More

Show and Tell

There’s a helpful technique writers use when telling a story called “show, don’t tell.” For example, I might write, There was a girl in the adjoining room. I’ve conveyed the facts, but nothing more. A more indirect way of expressing the same idea might be, John sensed he wasn’t alone even though the room appeared […]

Read More

Friendship: The Tie That Binds

There’s a well-known rhyme that describes the ends of Henry VIII’s six wives—Divorced, beheaded, died; divorced, beheaded, survived. Katheryn Parr, Henry’s sixth and final wife, enjoyed the sole position as a survivor. What’s interesting about Katheryn was her commitment to the “new faith” that was spreading through Europe and England. Katheryn brought piety to the […]

Read More